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The chatty bus

Nowadays, people are connected only by digital means. And, it’s been a likely one for many and on the other hand, few other are trying to connect through nice communication start.
Advancements are making nearer people to far away distance and farther people to nearby distance.

TedKngt wrote:

TedKngt
19:08 03-Jul-19
13

@Cruzeroqueen1 I certainly did not consider the lovely encounters you pointed out when I wrote that. I, too, had my fair share of happy memories on public transport. But loneliness is a bigger issue, and recently it has even been called an epidemic. In the long run, it takes more than nice conversations with strangers to alleviate the pain of loneliness – the connections have to be sustained.

True, @TedKngt – but it’s a step in the right direction, and everything has to start somewhere (a cliche but true nonetheless!)

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

@Cruzeroqueen1 I certainly did not consider the lovely encounters you pointed out when I wrote that. I, too, had my fair share of happy memories on public transport. But loneliness is a bigger issue, and recently it has even been called an epidemic. In the long run, it takes more than nice conversations with strangers to alleviate the pain of loneliness – the connections have to be sustained.

TedKngt wrote:

TedKngt
18:41 28-Jun-19
10

It would take more than a chatty bus to alleviate loneliness. After all, being lonely in a crowd is real. The quality of the conversation matters more than just initiating a chat.

But then again, you’ll never know if you would have a meaningful conversation if you never speak up…

Actually, @TedKngt must disagree with you there re the highlighted sentence. For some people, just the mere
act of exchanging a few words with someone is enough to ‘make their day’. When I was young and used public
transport, I always seemed to be the target for little old ladies to come and strike up a conversation, and I was
happy to oblige. And when I Iived in Wales, for many years I was a Samaritan, and came to understand that even a smile and a ‘hello’, or ‘nice day’ to someone who lived alone really lifted their spirits.

This may amuse:-

Northerner terrifies Londoners by saying “Hello” – YouTube
[Search domain www.youtube.com/watch?v=PT0ay9u1gg4]


A Northerner was apprehended by police in London today after walking around and saying “Hello” to strangers.

Last Edited by Cruzeroqueen1 at 29 Jun 10:46
Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

One of the advantages in living ‘north of Watford’ is that people are generally more chatty anyway. Local buses are well patronised by those of us with bus passes and I regularly strike up conversations with who I’m sitting next to. Sometimes initiated by me, sometimes by the other person. Daughter spent six months driving for one of the rural bus companies and said everyone knew each other and conversations went up and down the bus. Bags of sweets were shared along with the stories.

ESW
Lincolnshire

It would take more than a chatty bus to alleviate loneliness. After all, being lonely in a crowd is real. The quality of the conversation matters more than just initiating a chat.

But then again, you’ll never know if you would have a meaningful conversation if you never speak up…

Reminds me of this:



Wakefield, West Yorks.

It is but I don’t think its anything new. There have always been those who are happy to start a conversation or risk a rebuff and those more reluctant to do so. I think we just have more awareness that, without some assistance, the latter group could be prone to the issues associated with loneliness.

Essex UK

It’s a sad state of affairs when we have to be encouraged to chat with our fellow men!

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

@JoCarroll wrote:

Anything that gets people to put their phones down

A slight aside from the topic but I was having a discussion with someone last week who blamed all the worlds ills on phones/ipads. Technology is not the issue here. Alan has it spot on:

Fossil wrote:

they are not interested in talking with fellow commuters

I first commuted in London 40 years ago, then people hid behind huge newspapers (long before mobile phones & tabloid newspapers) or books. The only interaction was coordinating your elbows so they didn’t clash when you folded your newspaper. Folk in large cities have never wanted to chat on their daily commute. There’s a marked difference outside the rush hours. I’ve had many a good conversation on the underground, but typically you’ll be chatting with a tourist not a commuter.

Essex UK
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