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How electric vehicles are moving into the fast lane

Fossil wrote:

Fossil
15:54 05-Jan-20
38

With family sized electric cars costing £30,000 plus my question is, how are people supposed to afford them!!

A very good point, Alan @Fossil – I certainly couldn’t. I’ve only ever had one new car in my life – before
that it was always’clunkers’ – as OH is an engineer and could almost aways fix them. But at 75 he ‘hung
up his overalls’. So we got a brand new Dacia – the cheapest make and model we could find (I’m not a
‘name’ snob). Very basic – no electric windows, central locking, etc.and it has really served us well, not
one single problem with it. I’m hoping to keep it until it packs in, and then will replace it with the same.
(Incidentally, second hand cars are VERY expensive in Spain, plus you have to pay about €200 to change
over the registration into your name).

Last Edited by Cruzeroqueen1 at 06 Jan 10:40
Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

With family sized electric cars costing £30,000 plus my question is, how are people supposed to afford them!!

London

I was also looking for the same solution. very informative post.

new york

Fossil wrote:

Fossil
13:45 26-Dec-19
35

My concern has for a long time been how front line emergency vehicles can do their job with battery operated vehicles. Ambulances and police vehicles are in constant use use over an 8 hour period and as far as I am aware no battery operated vehicles can last that long without being charged meaning they would be unavailable for emergency calls, also I know of no electric car that is capable of the performance required by area, response and pursuit vehicles. Maybe high powered hybrids are the answer as with some of the London buses.

As things stand at the moment, Alan, that does seem to be the best option.

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

My concern has for a long time been how front line emergency vehicles can do their job with battery operated vehicles. Ambulances and police vehicles are in constant use use over an 8 hour period and as far as I am aware no battery operated vehicles can last that long without being charged meaning they would be unavailable for emergency calls, also I know of no electric car that is capable of the performance required by area, response and pursuit vehicles. Maybe high powered hybrids are the answer as with some of the London buses.

London

Again an example of ‘you can’t do right for doing wrong’!

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

Interesting piece and I’m not sure if its not worded to cause a bit of mischief. They way I read this is that the police are responsibly purchasing or leasing vehicles to reduce their environmental impact but accept that (at this stage of their development) electric cars may not be suitable for all aspects of police business.

Essex UK

Possibly contradicting the thread header here, reports just in issues concern from the police, having spent almost £1.5 million on electric cars, about them not being up to speed for use in emergencies:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/12/24/police-spend-thousands-electric-cars-cant-used-emergencies-reports/

Last Edited by Grey-Wolf at 26 Dec 01:43
Wakefield, West Yorks.

coolonespa wrote:

coolonespa
07:55 10-Oct-19
30

Great point Alan. I’d love to know if every one of these charging points is backed by a green tariff. Defeats the point of them if not.

Exactly @Fossil and @coolonespa – yet again we get a one-sided version of the so-called benefits but not a balanced argument.

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

Great point Alan. I’d love to know if every one of these charging points is backed by a green tariff. Defeats the point of them if not.

Essex UK
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