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The deaths on Everest

ESW wrote:

ESW
17:32 21-Jun-19
22

Lots of information here about coping with altitude. As @JoCarroll points out, you need to realise and accept your liitations – if you don’t they may kill you….

Interesting article, @ESW – I know my limitations, anything higher than a pavement, I pass!

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

Lots of information here about coping with altitude. As @JoCarroll points out, you need to realise and accept your liitations – if you don’t they may kill you….

ESW
Lincolnshire

ubrus wrote:

Came across an interesting video from the South China Morning Post featuring an editor that ended with quite a statement regarding Mount Everest. He said that the mountain is not there for you to climb, so it’s best to leave it alone — or something like that. Actually made me think. Not everyone climbs it out of vanity given how much of a challenge it is, but there’s definitely some recognition expected from surviving such a dangerous endeavour.

I agree with this – I can still remember the moment when I realised I wasn’t going to make it to the top of Kilimanjaro – and it was chastening to accept that there are some mountains I simply can’t climb. Not such a terrible lesson.

Altitude sickness seems very random. When I climbed Kilimanjaro, I shared my tent with an ultra marathon runner who was incredibly fit and had completed the Marathon des Sables and even run across the Arctic Circle! Yet she found the altitude hard to deal with.

I also read about Chris Moyes, and apparently that his reduced lung capacity as a smoker was actually an advantage…

London

Came across an interesting video from the South China Morning Post featuring an editor that ended with quite a statement regarding Mount Everest. He said that the mountain is not there for you to climb, so it’s best to leave it alone — or something like that. Actually made me think. Not everyone climbs it out of vanity given how much of a challenge it is, but there’s definitely some recognition expected from surviving such a dangerous endeavour.

Thanks Jo.

Essex UK

Steve – I can only suggest you try to notice what your body is telling you to do – and have someone with you who is fine at altitude and can tell you if you aren’t thinking straight as that is lack of oxygen and you need to go down urgently. If you keep that at the back of your mind, you can simply enjoy the view!!

Thanks Jo. No really been at any great height yet so I’ll just have to be careful when the moment arrives.

Essex UK

It varies from person to person – and from time to time. I was fine the first time I landed in Quito (9000 feet) after a long flight, but the second time – after a short flight from the Amazon basin, felt definitely odd for an hour or two. Within a few days I could climb over 10000 and, though I puffed a bit, I was fine. Driving up into the Rockies – so ascending at car-speed – I made it to 11000 and then found gasping as I walked across a car park. Climbing Kilimanjaro, I got the headache at 14000, and stopped at 16000 – it’s the very arbitrary nature of it that can make it so hard to deal with.

Is there a particular height that is the trigger point for altitude sickness?

Essex UK
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