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Tipping

Cruzeroqueen1 wrote:

I didn’t realise that the service charge was ‘optional’, so
that was good to know.

It’s optional on ships as well unless the ‘Service Charge’ is compulsory as per T&C’s. The majority are ‘Discretionary’ and can be deleted or changed by visiting the pursers desk.

London

Fossil wrote:

Fossil
09:29 21-Oct-19
26

Never tip on the card, always cash to the person concerned, that way I know they get

I agree with you there, Alan @Fossil. I didn’t realise that the service charge was ‘optional’, so
that was good to know.

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

Never tip on the card, always cash to the person concerned, that way I know they get it.

London

The Queen’s speech included plans for legislation for owners to have a legal obligation to pass on 100% of tips customers choose to give to workers. Read more at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45707539

Essex UK

See post 14…..

We’re probably stuck in a loop on this thread now, so I’ll leave it there.

Essex UK

coolonespa wrote:

Going back to the original thrust of the article. The hypothesis was that the culture had changed such that a tip was felt essential even when the service was poor and that many felt uncomfortable refusing to tip when the service wasn’t up to scratch

…then an excellent time to show a bit of ‘character’ and make a point: which I am not averse to under the circumstances.

@Solent_Richard wrote:

but what an incentive to give good service

Going back to the original thrust of the article. The hypothesis was that the culture had changed such that a tip was felt essential even when the service was poor and that many felt uncomfortable refusing to tip when the service wasn’t up to scratch.

Essex UK

@Solent_Richard the advantage of ‘Gratuities Included’ is of course that everyone pays.

London

Fossil wrote:

Do the staff actually have an option? Also there are cruise lines that include gratuities and you don’t hear the passengers or staff complaining.

Ah, who knows: but what an incentive to give good service and one can’t help but noting that unemployment in the US of A is below both that of the UK and the Euro Zone.

As we both well know cruise lines that have their gratuities included in the price have already factored in that cost with the initial ‘booking’ price so passengers in particular have little option and staff are ‘over the moon’.

Solent_Richard wrote:

I wonder if it ever occurs to people who criticise the ‘American’ way that the staff actually prefer the system as it is as, in particular, it does reward them for their service while, if the wage were to reflect the ‘gross’ cost then no doubt the customer would complain of higher prices.

Do the staff actually have an option? Also there are cruise lines that include gratuities and you don’t hear the passengers or staff complaining.

The problem with the tipping system is that it has changed over the years. If you go back to the 50’s when the original Queens, Elizabeth and Mary were plying their trade across the Atlantic tips were given for good service. Personnel were paid a wage that was not a secret as they were members of the National Union of Seamen. This I get from my 2 cousins who worked on both ships as waiters until the early 60’s. The other issue that arises from tipping is it is alleged they make up the staff wages, however, it is a closely guarded secret exactly how much staff do earn. On a trip this year I was told a crew member was discovered talking to a passenger about wages and had his contract terminated. I have told that the average rate of pay for a cabin steward/stewardess is $600 a month.

The ‘American’ way of tipping is great for ‘Americans’ or people who book through an ‘American’ agency as the prices are a lot lower and include things that we here in the UK pay extra for. They also give special deals for Fire, Police, Medical and armed forces personnel as well as those over 55 years of age. In the USA there is a two tier wages structure where the lower one, i.e the service industry makes up their wages with tips and ‘Americans’ are used to this. However the staff on ships don’t come under the law of the USA simply because the ships are not registered in the USA and the staff have their contracts usually arranged in their countries of origin.

Whilst I pay the tips, like Barrowman, I am just as capable of stopping them if the service is bad. I also would prefer to tip those that go beyond the expected level of service. If the job was that bad the staff would not be coming back year after year.

London
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