The Silver Travel Forum – important update

Our Forum is now only available to read rather than to contribute to discussions. You can still access all threads, but you will no longer be able to add your own comments. If you would like to write a review instead, please click here.

If you have any questions, please contact [email protected]

Reminder for Eleanor & Jocap

I had to meet a load of elderly aristocrats once, in North Yorkshire. Each one said:"How Dee Do", to which I answered all kinds of jolly things….
Apparently the correct answer is:"How Dee Do"…..end of!

Last Edited by unknown at 10 Feb 20:05
Nr. Seascale, Cumbria

I think a bit of a comment about the weather is such an easy way to break the ice & start a conversation for the brits. Inevitably, when overseas, males tend to try & get a conversation going with reference to the Premier league football.[/quote]

Interesting cultural signifier there. If you say "Jak sie mac ?" in Poland ( effectively the Polish: "how do you do ?) the response is often a detailed breakdown of the respondee’s current medical history & ailments.

If folk talk to me about football I haven’t got a clue what they’re talking about. So I’ll veer the conversation onto rolled Oats or Reptilian hybrids

I’ve often thought how "How do you do?" greeting is the most pointless expression in the English Language as the customary answer is repeating the question one is asked as response.

e.g.

A: "How do you do ?"
B. "How do you do."

So it’s really:

A: "Mind your Own Business?"
B: "Mind Your Own Business."

Last Edited by unknown at 10 Feb 20:02
Wakefield, West Yorks.

The land here seemed to turn green overnight! Grass went from being a background colour, to suddenly hitting you behind the knees, and every weed going emerged like rockets to knee high, without a sound!

Nr. Seascale, Cumbria
(Still Alan Titchmarsh voice)
So why do British folk winge about the weather ?

Just for the record I wasn’t wingeing about the weather, just pointing out that I wasn’t going to be doing the gardening in the rain I am pretty mad but not that mad. As it happens its done me a big favour. I think I overdid the weed & feed on the lawn, the ferrous smell was overpowering, so all this rain has washed it in & its lovely & green now.

I think a bit of a comment about the weather is such an easy way to break the ice & start a conversation for the brits. Inevitably, when overseas, males tend to try & get a conversation going with reference to the Premier league football.

Essex UK

(Still Alan Titchmarsh voice)

You know, if it’s one thing I can’t bear it’s folk complaining about the rain. It’s the one thing UK is very good at. Without it Britain wouldn’t have half the greenery it does from gardens to forestland. When one thinks of all those Siver Traveller Destinations borne of the arid desert dunes and tumbleweed through lack of it, desperate for a mere mirage of an oasis, rain is surely cause for rejoicing… So the next time it pours down. Don’t worry. Be happy. It’s good for the gardens and what’s good for the gardens must be good for the gardener…

So why do British folk winge about the weather ?

Wakefield, West Yorks.
I’m convinced, I’m going out into the garden right now!

It was the shortest gardening spell in history. I’d barely got to the shed before the rain came down.

Essex UK

Thanks, Grey Wolf…..I’ve been planting them all over, for the last 4 weeks- and they’re all showing the same growth, whether they’re 4 week or 10 days old, proving that seeds have much more sense that me!

Nr. Seascale, Cumbria

I’m convinced, I’m going out into the garden right now!

Essex UK

{*Alan Titchmarsh voice*):

With Daffodils now on the wane, Mayday has always been to my mind, traditionally, sowing day…and what better way to start than firmly working the Earth in tubs and baskets and dibbing in those beacons of summer’s bounty. Needing little care or attention, just some light showerings of water, we soon set the stage for summer’s pageant. The trailing beauty of voluptuous Nasturtiums, the bright orange beacons of the Indian Marigold, the cascading spillage of purple Lobelia, the soporiphic scented serendipity of the sweet pea. All naked to the teasing mercy of golden sunrays. Border or bedding area, tub or lone basket…it doesn’t take much to render garden, lawn, patio or windowbox into a riotous frenzy of seeded colour….seducing bees and butterflies alike into a drowsy droning lull of trembling breathless nectared moments…from bright destiny dappled timeless dawns to the the pinking gloams of dusk…

Wakefield, West Yorks.
Reminder for Eleanor & Jocap … your Indian Marigolds & Nasturtium seeds should be in NOW if you have not already planted them.

GW shows his caring Titchmarsh side

Last Edited by unknown at 10 Feb 17:28
Essex UK
11 Posts
Sign in to add your message

Back to Top