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Things to do when Retired

peterandjane18 wrote:

it’s only been a week after all

Welcome to the retirement club @peterandjane18 let us know how you get on with your new way of life.

London

Thanks to everyone for such informative comments and encouragement. One of the things that resonated with me is what HMJ said, let things come to you by doing what you want rather than stressing about what you feel you should be doing. It is quite a transition from being a rat on a wheel to a free wheeling free spirit. I think I will find it easier when the rain stops and I can get out and about a bit more. You all sound like you have taken to retirement with gusto so I am much encouraged. Just need to be patient – it’s only been a week after all !

yorkshirecat wrote:

can make a huge hole in the finances

Yes it can, but I found very little difference in nett money available despite a gross income drop of approx. £25,000. Whilst of course this doesn’t apply to early retirement, at 65 you stop paying National Insurance and the state pension for me kicked in, I had no more costly annual train fares to and from my office in London, you pay less income tax. The money I spent socialising on a virtually daily basis was saved. I also saved on clothes as I no longer had to buy suits, shirts. shoes etc that were required. As @coolonespa had correctly pointed out you have time to find the best deals not only in the living essentials but also your leisure life and the best thing of all, your answerable only to yourself.
London

yorkshirecat wrote:

can make a huge hole in the finances

Probably a concern for quite a few retirees in terms of how the finances will go. The good thing is that although the income may have dropped you’ve got the time now to search out the deals. There are classics like insurances where you may have been too busy to do anything other than let your policies auto renew and there are hundreds to be saved by hunting down the best deal, same for energy, broadband/telphone supplier. I cut my out goings by a considerable amount due to this.

Those holiday bargains that never seemed to fit with when you could take time off, late deals, selecting your flight/accomodation for the day that gives you the best deal.

Loads of deals around for eating out and even more if you have your main meal at lunchtime e.g. one of our locals does pie based meals at a significant discount.

Essex UK

I retired 5 years ago at the age of 55 and to be honest I don’t think there’s a moment in time when I’ve felt bored. I was already doing voluntary work as a Trustee of our CAB, but after retirement it felt too much like work (although for some people that might be good). So my voluntary activities centre around things I can do when I want. I’m lucky that my partner is also retired and so we travel extensively and last year spent about four months abroad on various trips. This inevitably involves lots of pre-planning and post downloading of photos and writing of reviews for ST. I’m also learning to play the piano, am a mystery dining (helps with the budget, but not the waistline), and love cooking and trying new recipes with the luxury of time. I’m also a great comper and frequently write letters to the travel sections of the weekend papers. To try to keep fit, we’ve just started walking the London Underground Lines above ground! There’s also a list of things to do that I’ve not even started!! However, I accept that everyone is different and many of my retired friends enjoy completely different lifestyles. It’s all about doing what you want to do and not worrying about what you think you should be doing.

yorkshirecat wrote:

yorkshirecat
11:38 13-Jan-20
11

I also retired early at 56 @peterandjane18 and decided to use my newfound freedom to learn new skills and indulge in hobbies that I’d neglected through a demanding senior management role which had been exciting and stimulating but at times mentally and physically exhausting. I signed up for a photography course so I could learn to use my digital camera properly. The assignments made me get out and explore my local environment in all weathers, both town and country, and talk to people in search of shots. It also gave me a good excuse to indulge my love of travel and passion for the natural world.

Writing my photography assignments rekindled my love of writing, so I wrote a novel and started working freelance, writing travel articles and catalogue descriptions for a couple of online sites in America and France. I also took up painting and drawing again, went for long hikes in the Peak District, improved my fitness so I could run 10k comfortably, volunteered to lead nature walks at our local sculpture park, counted wildflowers as part of a nationwide scheme. I made it a personal rule to always get up and dressed by 8 am and to never, ever to sit around watching daytime TV.

Now aged 64, I thoroughly enjoy my second career as a freelance travel writer, photographer and social media manager – something I would never have envisaged when I first took early retirement. I really look forward to each day and although I miss my work colleagues and the daily banter, I don’t miss the stress. Early retirement is a big change and can make a huge hole in the finances, but can also be a wonderful opportunity to explore new horizons.

Wow, that’s very impressive, @yorkshirecat !

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

I also retired early at 56 @peterandjane18 and decided to use my newfound freedom to learn new skills and indulge in hobbies that I’d neglected through a demanding senior management role which had been exciting and stimulating but at times mentally and physically exhausting. I signed up for a photography course so I could learn to use my digital camera properly. The assignments made me get out and explore my local environment in all weathers, both town and country, and talk to people in search of shots. It also gave me a good excuse to indulge my love of travel and passion for the natural world.

Writing my photography assignments rekindled my love of writing, so I wrote a novel and started working freelance, writing travel articles and catalogue descriptions for a couple of online sites in America and France. I also took up painting and drawing again, went for long hikes in the Peak District, improved my fitness so I could run 10k comfortably, volunteered to lead nature walks at our local sculpture park, counted wildflowers as part of a nationwide scheme. I made it a personal rule to always get up and dressed by 8 am and to never, ever to sit around watching daytime TV.

Now aged 64, I thoroughly enjoy my second career as a freelance travel writer, photographer and social media manager – something I would never have envisaged when I first took early retirement. I really look forward to each day and although I miss my work colleagues and the daily banter, I don’t miss the stress. Early retirement is a big change and can make a huge hole in the finances, but can also be a wonderful opportunity to explore new horizons.

I retired just before my 65th birthday. I hated it but had to retire as it was one of those jobs that had, and still does, 65 as the retirement age. I enjoyed what I did, missed working on a small dedicated and trustworthy team, the banter and general camaraderie, going to interesting places and mixing with interesting people. However, go I had to and fell into travel journalism and whilst I still miss the old job the new one has taken over my life. Now at 75 I am still travelling extensively on cruise ships and to the sun when possible. Yes, there is life after retirement but would I go back if I could, as Simon Cowell says, It’s a yes from me.

London

I retired early @peterandjane18 and I’m very happy I did. I realise its a big adjustment. As @northernblue says, the majority of people need some sort of routine and all of a sudden its down to you to set that routine, no longer being driven by a work routine. I saw it as a wonderful opportunity to try something new and spent the first year just casting around fairly randomly to see what took my fancy. My top tips for anyone retiring would be:
- Don’t get anxious as you try & find what you do with the rest of your life, it will come to you if you stay open to new opportunities
- Keep mind and body as active as you can
- Have fun, its the opportunity of a lifetime which many are denied

Happy to help any way I can, either on this thread or by private message.

Essex UK

I retired bang on the date that my occupational pension kicked in. It wasn’t something that I had planned to do as my wife is still working, but declining job satisfaction and increasingly frustrating office politics forced my hand. Initially, I thought that I might do so freelance contracting work but the opportunities never materialised and, quite frankly, I didn’t look too hard. Volunteering at a local museum or heritage railway has always been a possibility but I am reluctant to sign-up to any regular commitment. I enjoy my freedom and my hobbies but have found that it is important to have some sort of routine, even if it is only household tasks on set days. I do make an effort to get out and about rather than vegetate over a computer keyboard; and am aware that I need to increase my social contact with the outside world. Perhaps volunteering will find its place?

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