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Silver Travel Book Club - Book of the Month - August 2019

My visit to the pyramids at Giza and a trip to the museum at Cairo led to many hours of contemplation and a lifelong interest in the ancient egyptians and how the civilization evolved.

Manchester

Thanks everyone for the latest comments around this month’s Silver Travel Book Club title – ‘Underland: A Deep Time Journey’ by Robert Macfarlane.

@DRSask – I heard about the Tidal Bore when we were in the Maritimes a few years ago. It must be quite a sight…and well worth the unplanned detour! Closer to home (for us in the UK), I think there’s a similar phenomenon on the River Severn estuary?

Thanks @The-lone-traveller for letting us know about that mystical lucky rock in Greenland. Intriguing….

@LH – thanks for reminding us that there are so many fascinating ‘Underland’ places to explore, without having to travel too far from home.

Please keep those great comments coming, and here’s a reminder of this month’s Silver Travel Book Club challenge:

In Underland, Robert Macfarlane takes us on a journey into the worlds beneath our feet. From the ice-blue depths of Greenland’s glaciers, to the underground networks by which trees communicate, from Bronze Age burial chambers to the rock art of remote Arctic sea-caves, this is a deep-time voyage into the planet’s past and future.

What interesting things have you stumbled across on your ‘deep-time voyage’, whether above or below ground? Dig into the crevices of your own travel memories, and let us know.

I find indigenous Australian rock art fascinating. You spend time reflecting on what the meaning is & what it means to everyone today.

I was fortunate to visit Malta some years ago for a work conference, it’s such a beautiful country. We had some free time and decided to explore the island of Gozo. The caves and cavern were absolutely amazing.

@AndrewMorris many thanks for my “Famous Castles and Palaces” book which arrived this week along with my freebie Silver Traveller plug adaptor…AND at long last…a 100% genuine Silver Traveller Bag !! Yay !!!

Last Edited by GreyWolf at 10 Aug 18:15

Just finished the book ‘Mythos’ by Stephen Fry. If you really want to experience anything Greek, read this as it’ll give you a real insight into how the ancients viewed the/their World.

I love the Derbyshire caves and others nearby, as there is so much variety in them, from Peak Cavern in Castleton, to seeing early paintings on the cave walls with a guide in Cresswell Caves, to finding Blue John stone in the Blue John Caves, and floating along in a boat to see Speedwell Caves and of course Lead Mining has produced more underground caverns to visit in Matlock. I enjoy Macfarlane’s books and would enjoy reading this latest on the underground world.

Some years ago, I went on a voyage to Scooby Sund in East Greenland and the little red ship called the Explorer, we picked two local fishermen and a 11 year boy on route. On getting at a fork of the inlet we cam a cross a large red stone which seemed to be out of place to the rest of the land we could see. There was very thick ice and grey gravel with plenty of bearded seals, belugas and the odd Polar bear always with an ivory gull and fox following him. Apparently this rock is a drop off of the Ayes Rock in Australia, the locals state that is brings good fortune when they go fishing for Arctic char if you can SEE THE ROCK whilst fishing. We all wondered why does this theory exists.

@WendyEades, your story reminds me of seeing the caves in Nerja, Spain. They often have ballets and concerts there in the summer. Sadly we visited too early in the season to see or hear them in action. Gibraltor’s caves were also interesting.

An interesting thing we (an aunt, uncle and I) came upon by accident happened on a drive from Ontario to the Martimes in Canada. One option for our route to Nova Scotia was to take the ferry from Saint John, New Brunswick across the Bay of Fundy over to Digby. At this point my uncle told me he couldn’t swim and he got sea sick so he didn’t want to take the ferry. We ended up driving around the bay to Yarmouth which added three hours to the drive and another night on the road before getting to our destination. As luck would have it, we arrived at the Palliser Motel in Truro just in time to see the Tidal Bore. The motel is right on the Petitcodiac River and we joined the other guests as they lined up with their deck chairs to watch the tide come in and push the river back upstream in a big wave. It was cool to see and something we would have missed if we’d taken the ferry across.

Thanks for all the fabulous comments on your own ‘Underland’ or ‘Overland’ travel stories, to tie in with this month’s Silver Travel Book Club book of the month, ‘Underland: A Deep Time Journey’ by Robert Macfarlane.

@mexicanhat – gracias amigo for taking the time to share that wonderful anecdote from when you visited the tomb of Pacal Votan.

And @Noahsark – yes indeed, Victoria Hislop shone a very bright light on Spinalonga when she wrote The Island, with the TV adaptation making her hugely popular in her beloved Greece. It certainly sounds llike a fascinating place, doesn’t it?

@WendyEades – thanks for letting us know about those caves in Slovenia. And for letting us imagine your choir singing in the Cathedral cave. Magical!

In Underland, Robert Macfarlane takes us on a journey into the worlds beneath our feet. From the ice-blue depths of Greenland’s glaciers, to the underground networks by which trees communicate, from Bronze Age burial chambers to the rock art of remote Arctic sea-caves, this is a deep-time voyage into the planet’s past and future.

What interesting things have you stumbled across on your ‘deep-time voyage’, whether above or below ground? Dig into the crevices of your own travel memories, and let us know.

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