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Why we lie about being retired

Cruzeroqueen1 wrote:

Also in countries like China, where straight black hair is the norm, I’ve had people come up to me and touch my light brown curly (permed!) hair, and I’ve just smiled and accepted it as genuine curiosity, and they also smile back with lots of nods. (Quite a few want a photo taken with them also – their ‘new Western friend’!).

Linda had that a lot when we were there.

Essex UK

JoCarroll wrote:

JoCarroll
16:46 23-Aug-19
08

Do people also lie about their age? In our culture it’s not something people ask, but I’ve been in many places where it’s perfectly ok to ask – and I have no problem telling them my age. I can’t see the point of fibbing about it, but I know a lot of people are uncomfortable with it.

I’ve visited a few countries where I’ve been asked my age, and I don’t think they are being rude, and I also don’t mind
telling them. Also in countries like China, where straight black hair is the norm, I’ve had people come up to me and touch my light brown curly (permed!) hair, and I’ve just smiled and accepted it as genuine curiosity, and they also smile back with lots of nods. (Quite a few want a photo taken with them also – their ‘new Western friend’!).

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

JoCarroll wrote:

Do people also lie about their age?

I can only speak from personal experience but in the time since I’ve retired I’ve noticed a distant change from being reluctant to disclose ones age to being positively proud of your age & mentioning wherever possible.

HMJ wrote:

Our aim is to travel extensively

I think having a focus is the key and it can be as specific or as vague as suits the individual.

Essex UK

I retired early at the age of 55 from the Civil Service, and there has not been one second of the day when I have regretted my decision. But to be fair, I have a partner who was retired, we both have a generous pension and more importantly, good health. Our aim is to travel extensively whilst we have the health and money, and then when we’re really old and the money’s run out, we can look at our photos and reminisce!

Do people also lie about their age? In our culture it’s not something people ask, but I’ve been in many places where it’s perfectly ok to ask – and I have no problem telling them my age. I can’t see the point of fibbing about it, but I know a lot of people are uncomfortable with it.

Some great success stories here and thanks to all for sharing. The main thrust of the original article was that people feel worthless or have no identity if they are not associated with a full time job. So whilst the transition can be hard in some cases and/or take time, its great to have a page of success stories that show it can be done.

Essex UK

Thanks Gill @Cruzeroqueen1

London

Fossil wrote:

ossil
13:23 20-Aug-19
03

I hated the thought of retirement. I had one of those preserved occupations that say ‘Goodbye’ at 65. On the last day you hand your I.D back, have a farewell party and say farewell to those that you have travelled with over the years. I felt lost, no banter, no travel and for the first few months I was bored silly. With winter approaching I volunteered at my local hospital for 18 months before being made aware of Silver Travel Advisor. I wrote an article for them, won the monthly holiday prize but couldn’t take it. Met with Debbie and the rest is history as they say. Now been ‘Retired’ for 11 years next month and never seem to have a spare minute.

Yours is definitely a success story, Alan @Fossil – and a dream job!

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

I saw this – I know I left Child Protection in my mid-50s to buy a rucksack and travel round the world. I gave up my professional registrations – know it would be easy to pick them up again if I wanted to, but wanting any return to be a positive decision rather than it being the easiest thing to do.

I’ve never gone back – and, effectively, retired, living on bits and pieces until the pension kicked it. I don’t miss it for one minute – it was important and I’m proud of everything I achieved, but it’s someone else’s turn.

I hated the thought of retirement. I had one of those preserved occupations that say ‘Goodbye’ at 65. On the last day you hand your I.D back, have a farewell party and say farewell to those that you have travelled with over the years. I felt lost, no banter, no travel and for the first few months I was bored silly. With winter approaching I volunteered at my local hospital for 18 months before being made aware of Silver Travel Advisor. I wrote an article for them, won the monthly holiday prize but couldn’t take it. Met with Debbie and the rest is history as they say. Now been ‘Retired’ for 11 years next month and never seem to have a spare minute.

London
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