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Sound like a good idea? or just another load of garbage?

GreyWolf wrote:

the average used bed mattress contains around 1.5 million human skin scales alongside thousands
of bed mites

Not a nice thought!!

London

Well done Steve @coolonespa you might consider placing your old mattress outside and seeding it with flowers/veg of your choice, watering it, food shouldn’t be a problem given the average used bed mattress contains around 1.5 million human skin scales alongside thousands
of bed mites…perfect plant food…

Last Edited by GreyWolf at 13 Feb 20:25

Recently the axle broke on my grey wheelie bin. The council have delivered me a new one but rather than allow them to “bin” the old one I have turned it into a water butt. Suitably scrubbed out, it hold 200 litres of rain water that I’ll use in the summer to water my plants. So recycling the bin, saving water, reducing my water bill, sounds like a win win to me.

Anyone got their latest environment saving project to share?

Essex UK

Definitely food for thought there, Steve!

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

This is an interesting article from the BBC: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-51040155

Ibn essence its saying that the knee jerk redaction to get rid of plastic may well do more harm than good if we are not sensible about it e.g.

Glass bottles, for instance, are much heavier than plastic so are far more polluting to transport.

Cucumbers wrapped in plastic last 14 days longer, reducing food waste

Paper bags tend to have higher carbon emissions than plastic bags – and are more difficult to re-use. (I’m sure @grey-wolf mentioned this at some point)

So whilst we can take responsibility for some of our efforts to reduce waste/plastic in the ocean etc. because they are no brainers, its clear that governments need to produce clear guidelines based on hard evidence and certainly legislation on clear package labelling.

Quite a good video on what can & cannot be recycled from your shop too

Essex UK

iwent wrote:

I seem to remember that tin cans were the thing,

They certainly were iwent but tin of course has to come from foundries which emit noxious fumes. It does seem at times that plastic is the answer rather than the devil.

London

@Fossil wrote:

I wonder what shops and manufacturers will use

That’s a good point Alan. Knowing that part of the world quite well the amount of single use plastic derived from hotels & fast food outlets will be horrific, so I can see them focusing on enforcing it in the high volume places first and then driving down to the other places over time. There’s absolutely no chance of everyone complying from day one, but it a bold move and if they show they mean business from day one, they’ll get there, or at least significantly reduce the current consumption. You’re right though, practically some things won’t come in alternative packaging.

@iwent wrote:

But if you want to buy preprepared food, forget it!

Its hard work trying to find stuff with less packaging but I guess its down to each of us to do what we can. Here all cardboard & suitable plastics are responsibly recycled, so in realty we only need to focus on products with black plastic trays or the like that can’t be recycled.

@GreyWolf wrote:

300 million plastic cups and straws discarded in UK over Xmas alone.

Hopefully not and certainly not in this house. Everyone has to do their bit as and when they can.

Essex UK

300 million plastic cups and straws discarded in UK over Xmas alone.

coolonespa wrote:

The Bahamas who will be implementing a ban on single use plastic from 1 Jan 2020

I’m hoping they mean all single use plastic, including food containers etc.
Even when you want to “cook can scratch” (known as cooking!) it can be difficult to avoid layers of plastic, cardboard, etc. But if you want to buy preprepared food, forget it!

Fossil wrote:

I wonder what shops and manufacturers will use for displaying and selling items such as oil, anti-freeze, diesel fuel additives such as AdBlue right down to polish and screen wash

I seem to remember that tin cans were the thing, and before that eg oil from a larger container bought at the carriage.
We’re really going to have to put our memories into gear, and start reusing things.

coolonespa wrote:

The Bahamas who will be implementing a ban on single use plastic from 1 Jan 2020

That’s excellent news Steve but I have a question. Whilst doing away with single use plastic I wonder what shops and manufacturers will use for displaying and selling items such as oil, anti-freeze, diesel fuel additives such as AdBlue right down to polish and screen wash.

London
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