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What are you reading ?

Just started reading another Lee Child Reacher book – The Hard Way – he’s always a good read.

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

I think there’s quite enough drama on the news everyday, so delving into Icke’s darker regions via an 875 epic is unlikely to make my reading list. Probably take up my whole hand luggage allowance too

You certainly read an amazing variety of material GW (said with admiration).

Essex UK

“The Trigger” (non fiction) by David Icke. Published on 9/11 about 9/11 at 875 pages is David Icke’s latest mammoth expose of the duplicities surrounding the 9/11 event, its perpetrators and its aftermath throughout the world in terms of restriction of civil rights, freedoms and censorship. An event which Icke posits was a pre-arranged event in transforming human society into a global prison camp and ushering in a New World Order. Shocking and revelatory, reading a David Icke book takes you to the darkest depths of what is going on in this world and its shadow power brokers, which you may well be happier not knowing, yet which will sooner or later affect every one of us. Highly informative and thoroughly evidenced, this book, as thick as an old phone directory, while very hard to lift is equally hard to put down once you engage with his very stimulating narrative, his sportsman’s stamina hurdling you from chapter to chapter. Of all the writers I’ve ever read I think David Icke is the only one who leaves me with that feeling of “I wish I hadn’t read that…wish I didn’t know that”. Ignorance being far from bliss. Indeed the title itself is intentionally ambivalent, triggering the mind of the reader to a wake up call. Highly recommended, certainly not a book for the comfort zone corner. For all his lampooning since the infamous Wogan appearance, a consistently brave and courageous writer shining light into the darker corners of life most of us prefer not to see.

Certainly sounds like an interesting read @GreyWolf

Essex UK

@coolonespa good point, yes that is raised in the book alongside the six degrees of separation ~ the idea that if you pick up any six people in the land somebody will know somebody who knows somebody who knows you. Also the fact that if you had a room of only 26 people in all likelihood one pair will share the same birthday. What isn’t as easily rationalised are people who in a split second have had their life route changed or even saved by a moment of irrational behaviour (one instance tells of someone meeting their future partner that way by running the opposite way down a railway platform, another of someone avoiding a German bombing raid hit by the overwhelming desire to stop and tie a shoe lace. Another of a man who on his daily commute on three occasions felt the inexplicable urge to drive back on himself, only to find out later he had avoided three fatal collisions by doing so, had he stayed on the usual route.

The author also explores the millions of undiscussed coincidences which go unmentioned in life.

Last Edited by GreyWolf at 10 Sep 16:40

coolonespa wrote:

coolonespa
06:56 09-Sep-19
772

I’ve never been convinced by this whole coincidence theory. I think we are programmed to look for commonality & seek it out sub consciously in our conversations & encounters. How many times have you travelled thousands of miles and met someone who lives a few miles from where you do, or knows aunt Tillly, or lives near a relative of yours, been to a place you visited before etc.
Is that coincidence or if you talk to someone for long enough there’s inevitably going to be a common thread between your lives. Don’t know, just a thought.

In recent years I have met a lady on Princess Cay island – from a different ship – with whom I once worked in our local dog rescue charity shop. And on an Australian cruise a couple and I kept eyeing each other up until one of us said, ’Don’t I know you?’ And it turned out they lived on the other side of our local town here, and we’d met at the bowling alley the year before.

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

I’ve never been convinced by this whole coincidence theory. I think we are programmed to look for commonality & seek it out sub consciously in our conversations & encounters. How many times have you travelled thousands of miles and met someone who lives a few miles from where you do, or knows aunt Tillly, or lives near a relative of yours, been to a place you visited before etc.
Is that coincidence or if you talk to someone for long enough there’s inevitably going to be a common thread between your lives. Don’t know, just a thought.

Essex UK

“Coincidence” (non fiction) by Brian Inglis. Again another recommended text from the page references of Anthony Peake. We’ve all experienced coincidences, great and small, be they chance meetings, happenstance encounters, symbols, objects or somesuch. Be they trivial or potentially lifechanging. Inglis examines the possibilities of greater universal forces at play beyond laws of probability. Coincidence was something which Gustav Jung took so seriously he awarded it a science status and wrote an entire book about synchronicity. In Inglis’ book he chronicles real life case studies who wrote into him, from politicians to pop stars to the ordinary (wo)man in the street with their accounts of the almost impossible, unlikely and bizarre coincidences which in some cases turned out to be life changing or even life saving, alongside the various theories which attempt to explain coincidences from to psychology to quantum physics. The book actually contains a form on the back pages to copy, complete and refer the Koestler society of psychic research for those who have had the coincidences thread weaving throughout their life tapestry. How have seeming coincidences affected your life for better or worse ?

I’ve watched most of those films GW, all very interesting.

Essex UK

“A Life of Philip K. Dick ~ The Man Who Remembered the Future” (non-fiction biography) by Anthony Peake. I’ve read 9 out of the 10 Anthony Peake books now which tend to deal with edge of consciousness scenarios. In this one he looks at the life and work of Sci Fi author Philip K Dick who had his own paranormal encounters and also drew much attention to himself from the authorities through his work. I ‘ve also been watching “The Man in the High Castle” on Amazon Prime, written by Philip.K.Dick it imagines an alternate timeline where Germany won WWII and America is now under Hitler’s dictatorship.

The useful thing about Anthony Peake are his film references which he uses in exploring time anomalies. A list of the ones I’ve seen here from reading his books and most are now available for mere pence on DVD. All thinky thinky, mind stretching and very engaging, list here:

Vanilla Sky
The Adjustment Bureau
Groundhog Day
Waking Life (Rotoscope animation)
Inception
Paycheck

Several of the above titles were adapted from Philip K. Dick stories and while very different in flavour, each film explores the theme of alternate time scenarios and perceived reality.

Peake’s website here: http://www.anthonypeake.com

Last Edited by GreyWolf at 06 Sep 15:33
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