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Favourite eating place in Hong Kong?

Its worth saying that I ate in a variety of restaurants and hotels in Thailand, from tiny ones the locals use to the bigger ones & in hotels and had no problems or tummy issues at all.

Yes, the same was true for us. We were only in Thailand for three days as part of our RTW trip, but we did have some things that might have been considered dodgy, such as drinking coconut milk with a straw from a coconut in one of the floating markets. No problems whatsoever.

Northamptonshire

The markets were an eye opener too with butcher’s stalls with no attempt at keeping meat cool and flies everywhere. Occasionally the vendor would wave a fan over the meat to try and discourage them. The live chickes for sale were so scrawny we began to understand why chicken dishes contained more bone than meat.

We visited a local market near Kashgar (forget the Kashgar Sunday Market with all its tourists) where we were the only foreigners. I have fond memories of eating lunch – bread and water melon slices – with a sheep’s head at my feet. Every so often, the vendor would pick it up to extol its virtues to a prospective buyer. It was great fun – the experience, not the sheep’s head….

ESW
Lincolnshire
When we were in Bangkok we were advised that it is often safer to eat food from street vendors than from hotels, because the street vendors have enormous turnover so the food tends to be really fresh, whereas the hotels are quite likely to serve you rehashed leftovers as their restaurants are often much quieter.

We were told the same, in fact most of the guide books encourage you to try it. We stood a watched a few cook & serve and as you say the turnover was impressive & it was quite entertaining to watch the interaction between vendor & customers. The problem was the guy was using one spatular to move raw meat from a container to the wok, to turn over partly cooked food and serve cooked food into containers. On more than one occasion the spatular went straight from raw for to serving food. I think the locals digestives system have probably developed to accept this but we are so fastidious about food hygiene in the UK that I don’t think our systems would have taken it. Its worth saying that I ate in a variety of restaurants and hotels in Thailand, from tiny ones the locals use to the bigger ones & in hotels and had no problems or tummy issues at all.

Essex UK

We were surprised as well, but that was what we were told. Caveat emptor, clearly.

Last Edited by unknown at 07 Aug 08:39
Northamptonshire
it is often safer to eat food from street vendors than from hotels, because the street vendors have enormous turnover so the food tends to be really fresh

This may be the case in some places. We we warned against using street vendors in Kashgar. Having seen the fermenting piles of meat waiting to be cooked we certainly wouldn’t have wanted to eat from any of them…

ESW
Lincolnshire

Top marks for original location, anyway!

When we were in Bangkok we were advised that it is often safer to eat food from street vendors than from hotels, because the street vendors have enormous turnover so the food tends to be really fresh, whereas the hotels are quite likely to serve you rehashed leftovers as their restaurants are often much quieter.

Last Edited by unknown at 07 Aug 08:11
Northamptonshire

Not been to Hong Kong but I’ll offer one up for Asia though. The Top Spot at Kuching in Malaysia. Curiously set on the top of a multi-story car park, it is a food court of sorts. The central seating area is surrounded by various stalls, mainly selling fish, where you can choose your fish, crab etc. and tell them how you want it cooked. You can order vegetables, rice etc. to accompany your choice and drinks. We attended on a Saturday night (probably not the best night) and frankly it was a bit chaotic, with our fish, rice, vegetable, drinks all arriving at intervals, none together. The food was all good though and the atmosphere was quite an experience. I’ll be going back if we visit Kuching again but on another night.

Essex UK

We tried a few places while we were there, but our favourite eating place was Jumbo Floating Restaurant. We went out across the harbour to it at night, and it looked absolutely amazing.

Anyone else have any favourites to share?

Northamptonshire
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