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Digital Postcards from Singapore

Singapore is also a fascinating place by night, particularly around the Marina Bay Complex…

…with the Singapore Flyer…

…and the Marina Bay Sands Hotel…

Of course no visit to Singapore is complete without a visit to the iconic Raffles Hotel…

The inner courtyard is a haven of tranquility….

…when compared with the general hustle and bustle of the exterior, particularly along Bras Basah Road….

Though you wouldn’t think it judging by my photograph. (Now that is what I call patience)

But the main attraction for many tourists is to visit the famous ‘Long Bar’…

…and of course, partake in the bar’s most famous offering, the Singapore Sling…

And for those who may baulk at the price, here’s the recipe to try at home

Cheers

Raffles Singapore is now fully closed for a refurbishment with a planned reopening at the end of 2018

Last Edited by Solent_Richard at 23 May 08:35

A short distance further up the Singapore River is another famous historical area that really comes to life of an evening, Clark Quay…

We had decided to visit one of the more famous of the area’s seafood restaurants, Jumbo (I can only assume it was named after one of the floating restaurants in Aberdeen, Hong Kong)…

As lovers of crab this particular crustacean was to take centre stage this evening…

A starter…

and of course a main course…

The problem is of course that ‘Chilli Crab’ can get a little messy hence any restaurant worth their salt will provide suitable protection…

And boy do you need it. See what I mean?…

This world famous dish where the crab is simply divine while the sauce is the star – sweet, savoury, spicy and supremely satisfying. In fact its finger lickin’ good.

Last Edited by Solent_Richard at 16 May 08:07

coolonespa wrote:

One of your pics shows the Forum restaurant. I didn’t even know we had our own restaurant

I knew there was something fishy about it.

One of your pics shows the Forum restaurant. I didn’t even know we had our own restaurant

Essex UK

Really excellent pictures @Solent_Richard

London

Continuing this digital postcard tour of Singapore is a daytime walk along one of Singapore’s most historic walks, Boat Quay…

Boat Quay is a historical quay in Singapore which is situated upstream from the mouth of the Singapore River on its southern bank and a good place to start the walk is from the point between Anderson Bridge…

…and the rear side of The Fullerton Hotel…

Historically this area was the busiest part of the old Port of Singapore, handling three-quarters of all shipping business during the 1860s. Today we are reminded of its history with a number of significant statues along the river bank…

…while not forgetting other scenes that would have been played out many years past…

Today, however, Boat Quay is the soft front to the composolitian banking and financial sectors lying immediately behind it while it’s primary role is now more socially economic with tourism, dining and entertainment the new role in this conservation area…

In its more modern role some establishments have have become more popular than others. One such place is Harry’s Bar: famous for its televised sport and lively evening atmosphere, though somewhat quiet during the daytime…

…though not of course as famous as Raffles Hotel which will be covered soon.

Seafood features prominently in numerous Boat Quay restaurants…

…and there are always amazing displays outside each establishment…

A daytime visit can be fun but is no substitute for soaking up the atmosphere of an evening and there is nothing like a traditional dish of Singapore Chilli Crab to experience just what Boat Quay is all about…

Last Edited by Solent_Richard at 11 May 07:55

The Singapore Waterfront and Singapore River.

I never cease to marvel how the Singapore waterfront has changed since I first arrived there in March 1964. In those days it was ‘the waterfront’ where passengers and merchant seaman landed from their ships anchored offshore. This is how it looked…

Photograph courtesy of https://thelongnwindingroad.wordpress.com

…and as it looks now…

On the very right hand side is what is now The Fullerton Hotel. In 1964 it was the General Post Office and I well remember calling there many times to send postcards home to my parents.

The red roofed low building in my photograph is ‘Clifford Pier’, jutting out from Collier Quay, where the small tender shuttles berthed to off load their passengers and behind that was the famous ‘Change Alley’.

It’s always fun to explore the area between Collier Quay and the Singapore River…

but first, to give some idea of how land has been reclaimed, this view has replaced what was once open sea…

Lets start just in front of Collier Quay at Singapore’s iconic Merlion statue…

…which is also in front of the Fullerton Hotel…

(We are scheduled to join at least one cruise from Singapore next year and have planned a pre-cruise stay in Singapore. It had originally been my intention to stay at the Fullerton for nostalgia’s sake however we have something entirely different planned for this particular stay so the Fullerton can wait)

Next up for interest along the Collier Quay walk id the old Clifford Pier…

That’s the daylight view, here it is at night…

Completely refurbished it now operates as a highly recommended very upmarket restaurant…

…complete with authentic decor…

Change Alley has all but lost its original magnetism so I would now suggest retracing one’s steps back to the Merlion, crossing the road and making an approach along the Singapore River bank to Anderson’s Bridge…

Officially opened in March 1910 this elegant bridge is a combination of intricate plaster and metalwork unmatched by any other bridge in Singapore. It accommodates both pedestrians and motor vehicles.

Currently a great attraction for tourists it temporarily had a murkier past when, during the Japanese Occupation of Singapore of 1942 to1945, the severed heads of criminals were hung on Anderson Bridge as a warning to discourage citizens from breaking the law.

Next Up: a walk along the river to discover Boat Quay and Clarke Quay.

Last Edited by Solent_Richard at 26 Apr 10:42

Well that last post didn’t quite go to plan as I inadvertently hit the "submit’ button and the ‘Edit’ feature refused to work.

Not to worry, here’s where we left off…

…“Not all plants need the mist and climatic conditions, there’s an amazing” …

Display that wasn’t actually in need of the conditions inside the dome. It still looked quite amazing to us, the cleverly arranged Lego Garden

Other equally well presented displays were very genuine, like the ‘National Floral Display’…

Of course the higher one went along the walkways…

…the better the views became…

There was such an abundance of floral types it became difficult to remember the names of all on display…

So typical of the Singapore Administrative style, there were plenty of descriptive notices available…

…and always somewhere to utilise that camera zoom…

So that basically ends our visit to gardens by the Bay. What I would add is that while there is no charge to visit the outside gardens there is to enter the two Domes. It would be a real travesty to penny pinch and not see the whole project.

Next Up: Downtown and The Singapore River.

And so we move across to the second of the glass domes, known as The Cloud Forest. The place to witness lush vegetation of tropical highlands in a soaring, contemporary greenhouse. On entry one is confronted by a spectacular waterfall …

…and overhead walkways…

I’m not out of focus in here, there are areas permanently veiled in mists to support the diverse vegetation and hidden floral gems…

Here too , as in the Flower Dome, there are many interesting sculptures, like this one entitled ‘Rush of Nature’ by Mark Quinn…

Not all plants need the mist and climatic conditions, there’s an amazing

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