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Did you know - Facts

@Cruzeroqueen1 wrote:

A fascinating experience!

Very interesting Gill

Essex UK

Last time I was in Bali, @traveldreamlands – 6 or 7 years ago – our taxi drive pointed out to us a cremation
was occuring up ahead in a field at the side of the road, and did we want to see it. After ascertaining it
wouldn’t be disrespectful – he said not at all, as long as you wear a sarong (which he lent us) as it was a
joyous ceremony. An old lady was placed in a ‘crate’ made out of lengths of bamboo, and the heat was
generated by bottle of butane gas. There was a ‘shrine’ close by with lots of offerings to the gods of fruit
and flowersand various other small itmes, and apparently the whole village was in attendance, and everyone
looked as though they were enjoying themselves. Our guide said it was a cause for celebration as once the
body was burnt, the soul would be released. He also told us that these ceremonies only took place on
‘propitious’ days, and should someone die quite a while ahead of one of those special days, then the body
may be temporarily buried, then dug up later for the cremation. A fascinating experience!

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

Did you know that Bali cows and bulls play a large role in traditional cremation ceremonies in which beautifully decorated wooden cattle statutes containing the body of the deceased (called the patulangan) are burned during large and surprisingly festive ceremonies. These statues actually come in different animals, such as lions and deer, but bulls (for man) and cows (for women) are traditionally reserved for royalty and members of the Brahman caste, the highest caste within the Hindu caste system that is made up from priests and spiritual teachers. During our time on Bali, we didn’t witness one of these ceremonies but we did see some very interesting photos of a royal cremation ceremony that took place in 1949. We randomly found this old book in a second shop in the Netherlands. The book is called “Bali in Kleuren” (Bali in Color) and it shows some fascinating images of life on Bali before the big tourism boom.

Here I recently posted the article about this and included pictures from 1949, so you are welcome to check it out: https://traveldreamlands.com/cow-pray-love-a-bovine-bali-guide/

@Grey-Wolf wrote:

The primary use of recycled batteries

Interesting one, I never knew that.

Essex UK

Dormice spend a considerable amount of their lives asleep, their name deriving from ‘dormir’ the French verb to sleep.

Wakefield, West Yorks.

Rabbits first came to Britain in the 12th century, imported by the Normans,

Wakefield, West Yorks.

The primary use of recycled batteries are the extracted zinc particles which are then spread on farmers’ fields for fertiliser.

Wakefield, West Yorks.

A national survey conducted in USA reveals 73% of Americans have experienced what they believe to have been a supernatural encounter, 55% believe in spiritual health and faith healing, 41% believe in ESP and telepathy, 29% believe in Extra Terrestrial presence here on Earth, 18% believe in ghosts, while 27% refute all paranormalia as being utter nonsense.

Source : “Phenomenon ~ The Secret History of U.S. Government Investigations into ESP & Psychokinesis” by Annie Jacobsen

Wakefield, West Yorks.

Grey-Wolf wrote:

Grey-Wolf
17:02 04-Oct-20
6569

Amazon boss Jeff Bezos earns £12.2 million per hour.

His underpaid workers earn that for him. Obscene!

Albox, Costa Almeria, Spain

Amazon boss Jeff Bezos earns £12.2 million per hour.

Wakefield, West Yorks.
6569 Posts
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